chơi game online ăn tiền thật_w88club_cá độ bóng đá online miễn phí https://www.google.com//6e8 A waterwheel-powered flour mill at the heart of the Similkameen Fri, 27 Jul 2018 17:43:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 89963242 Contest: Share Your Dirty Cookbook Pages #dirtiestcookbookpage https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/2018-contest-share-your-cookbook/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2018-contest-share-your-cookbook /6e8/blog/2018-contest-share-your-cookbook/#comments Wed, 21 Mar 2018 05:33:56 +0000 /6e8/?p=8464 Share Your Dirtiest Cookbook Page For A Chance To Win One-Of-A-Kind Grist Mill Experience We love cookbooks, especially the kind that are passed down from person-to-person. There¡¯s something wonderful about a well-loved, dog-eared, grease-stained cookbook. A mint-condition cookbook suggests that it¡¯s just a status symbol, not an oft-referenced resource for culinary adventures. Frequently, the best […]

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Share Your Dirtiest Cookbook Page
For A Chance To Win
One-Of-A-Kind Grist Mill Experience

We love cookbooks, especially the kind that are passed down from person-to-person. There¡¯s something wonderful about a well-loved, dog-eared, grease-stained cookbook. A mint-condition cookbook suggests that it¡¯s just a status symbol, not an oft-referenced resource for culinary adventures.

Frequently, the best recipes look like they¡¯ve survived a food fight and have notes in the margins unlocking the secret adjustments that make them perfect. And, of course, the binding is broken from being held open on a favourite recipe one-too-many times.

Real cooks have dirty cookbooks.

And cookbooks can also be so much more; for many families, the passing down of a cookbook from one generation to the next can be a significant emotional milestone, like the passing down of closely-held traditional knowledge. Once opened, the recipes inside might bring back memories of special festive gatherings, or funny reminders of epic kitchen failures, or even the warm comfort of the go-to recipe for a regular family dinner. Every well-loved cookbook has a story (or ten).

We would love to see your most abused pages in your own cookbooks and hear their stories.

chơi game online ăn tiền thật_w88club_cá độ bóng đá online miễn phí

(entries can be made via any of the methods outlined below):?

  1. Take a picture of your dirtiest cookbook page(s) and post it on our Facebook Page. Be sure to share a story or two about that particular cookbook or the recipe(s) on the photographed page.
  2. Post a photo of your page on Instagram with the hashtag #DirtiestCookbookPage and tell your story in the caption. Be sure to tag us (@old_grist_mill).
  3. Tweet a photo on Twitter and include the hashtag #DirtiestCookbookPage. Be sure to tag us (@old_grist_mill).

You’re welcome to post as many photos as you’d like, but you’ll still only have one chance to win per each of the three methods listed above. A short list of the dirtiest pages / best stories submitted (as selected by our team) will be posted on April 2nd for public voting. The one with the most votes on April 9th will win the grand prize. Secondary prizes will be randomly drawn from all entries recieved on April 9, 2018.

Rules & Regulations

There are 4 prizes available in total including an Experience Package worth $400 that includes a private dinner for six in our lovely garden, a basket of Similkameen preserves from our gift shop and more. Lesser packages of event tickets and specific products from our gift shop will also be available.

The contest is open to any legal resident of Canada (excluding the province of Quebec) who is at the age of majority in his/her province or territory of residence or older at the time of entry, except current employees of the Grist Mill and Gardens or their immediate family members. The odds of being selected as a potential winner are dependent upon the number of eligible entries received.

All entries considered inappropriate or offensive by the Grist Mill and Gardens will be disqualified. (Yes, we know that by asking for the “dirtiest pages”, some of you might take certain liberties… that’s not what we’re looking for, and you know it.)

Full Details
Copyright in all entries submitted for this Competition remains with the respective entrants. However, entrants agree that by submitting an entry to the competition, they grant the Grist Mill and Gardens a royalty free, perpetual irrevocable worldwide license to use and republish their entry. This includes sharing the entry through social media and publication by the Grist Mill and worldwide in any of their publications, their websites and/or in any promotional material. (To translate: we don’t want to get in trouble if we share your story with others.)

The winner will be notified by the Grist Mill and Gardens on or before April 10, 2018. The secondary winners will be selected at random from a ballot which comprises all the qualifying entries. Any winner who is not contactable or who fails to return contact within 72 hours of notification after reasonable efforts have been made to contact them will be disqualified, they thereby forfeit their right to the prize, no compensation will be given and a reserve entrant will be selected as an alternative winner.

The prizes are non-negotiable, non-transferable and non-refundable. In the event of unforeseen circumstances we reserve the right to substitute the prize package for an alternative of equal or greater value. We reserve the right to modify, delay, postpone or cancel this contest in the event of circumstances outside of its reasonable control.

This contest and its rules shall be governed by the laws of British Columbia and subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of BC courts.

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Call for Entertainers – 2018 Summer Concert Series and more https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/call-for-entertainers-2018/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=call-for-entertainers-2018 /6e8/blog/call-for-entertainers-2018/#respond Sat, 06 Jan 2018 20:20:08 +0000 /6e8/?p=5537 The Grist Mill and Gardens has now started planning our 2018 schedule of events and have numerous opportunities for musicians and other entertainers. 1) Summer Concert Series The Grist Mill is a 12 acre Provincial Heritage Site in the heart of the Similkameen Valley featuring western Canada¡¯s only working waterwheel-powered flour mill and stunning gardens. […]

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Valdy performing in our Summer Kitchen in summer 2016.
Valdy performing in our Summer Kitchen in summer 2016.

The Grist Mill and Gardens has now started planning our 2018 schedule of events and have numerous opportunities for musicians and other entertainers.

1) Summer Concert Series

The Grist Mill is a 12 acre Provincial Heritage Site in the heart of the Similkameen Valley featuring western Canada¡¯s only working waterwheel-powered flour mill and stunning gardens. Our Summer Kitchen provides an intimate, rustic outdoor venue for folk, roots and world music for audiences of up to 200 from June to Sept.

Over the last five years, we’ve hosted a very successful evening concert series and will be doing the same again for Summer 2018.?We love the line-ups we’ve pulled together, from Juno-winning folk legends like Valdy, Shari Ulrich, Lester Quitzau and Bill Bourne, break-out stars like?Old Man Luedeke and Pharis & Jason Romero, rising up-and-comers like Sarah Jane Scouten, 100 Mile House and Scott Cook and crowd-pleasers like Tal Bachmann, Mae Moore, The Tequila Mockingbird Orchestra, The Sweet Lowdown, and The Eisenhauers.

We love acoustic instruments played with skill. We love stories. We love both original compositions and traditional tunes, performed with heart and soul. In terms of genre, we love anything that suits our rustic venue.

Our annual series typically features one outdoor evening show a week from late-June to early September, timed to coincide with the spectacular sunsets here in the Similkameen Valley. Exact dates are somewhat flexible, but we’d prefer Thursday to Saturday evenings to ensure the largest possible audiences.

If you’re part of a group of no more than four members that might be suitable for headlining one of these shows, we’d love to hear from you.

2) Special Event Days

11280517_1757465281146861_281209523_n
Shari Ulrich performing in our Summer Kitchen to a full crowd.

Each year, the Grist Mill hosts a number of special event days with our partners including Victoria Day, Father’s Day, Canada Day, BC Day and Labour Day as well as our Fall Fair in September and Apple Day festival (in October). We’re always looking for musicians or other performers interested in being a part of these family-oriented events and we can accommodate amplified performances in our Summer Kitchen, roving or busking style performances throughout our site and more.

These events are great opportunities for us to work with groups that may fit outside of the genres associated with our concert series.

3) Private Events

The Grist Mill often hosts events such as weddings, reunions or private receptions are are often asked for a list of recommended musical acts to play unamplified in our gardens for their event. Classical guitar, wind or string trios or quartets would be ideal for these sorts of opportunities.

Get in touch so we can add you to our list of suggestions, or even book you ourselves.

4) Use Our Venue

Perhaps none of these other opportunities are quite right for you; maybe you’d like to organize your own performance, and just use us as a venue. If you’re a theatre or dance troupe interested in doing an outdoor show, a band looking for an affordable (and memorable) venue or an event organizer looking for a big space that can do many different things at the same time, please get in touch. For the right event, we can help promote your event, sell your tickets and more. We also have our own sound system suitable for audiences of up to 200 people.


If you’re interested in any of these opportunities, please contact us at entertainers@ tỷ lệ cá cược bóng đá www.starhotelbattambang.com no later than Feb 15, 2018 so that we can start planning our season’s schedule. We’d appreciate some or all of the following information:

  • Group/Artist Name
  • Main Contact and contact information (phone #, email address, etc)
  • Theme/Style of Music or Type of Act
  • Number of performers in act
  • Available Dates & Times
  • A brief overview of the experience and background of the act
  • The rundown of the equipment requirements for your performance
  • Compensation expectations
  • Any other information you think would help us find the perfect opportunity for you

We would also appreciate a sample of you performing, either a video or audio recording. You can email us links or mail us CDs or DVDs, whatever is most appropriate. If you don’t have recordings, we may request an in-person audition.

Please direct all questions or submissions?to Chris Mathieson, Site Operator at entertainers@oldgristmill.ca.

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Project: Identifying Apples https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/identifying-apples/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=identifying-apples /6e8/blog/identifying-apples/#respond Fri, 20 Oct 2017 04:47:10 +0000 /6e8/?p=4903 To learn more about why we’re asking for your help identifying these apple varieties, visit this post. Below are photos of each of the kinds of apple we were able to assemble from our orchard this year. In some cases, we’re pretty much 100% sure what they are, but many others are completely unfamiliar to […]

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To learn more about why we’re asking for your help identifying these apple varieties, visit this post.

Below are photos of each of the kinds of apple we were able to assemble from our orchard this year. In some cases, we’re pretty much 100% sure what they are, but many others are completely unfamiliar to us. We trust that both times trees were planted on our site, there was significant research done to ensure they are historically interesting varieties. It’s even possible that in our older orchard the variety names are all correct, just transposed onto the wrong tree.

Click on the first photo in the top left corner to open a slideshow featuring all our photos. We’ve commented on each one with whatever information or rumours we have; you’re welcome to add your own comments. (To find the comments; just click on the “comment” icon when you get into the slideshow.)

Also, you can scroll further down this page for links to some of our favourite apple-identifying resources.

Orange Pippin – Detailed information on more than 600 apple varieties.
Apple Name – This site is presented by a partnership of apple enthusiasts from the USA, Canada, and UK and includes a great set of fruit identification tools.
Fruit ID – A community-created catalogue for apple identification.

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What’s This Apple? https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/whats-this-apple/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=whats-this-apple /6e8/blog/whats-this-apple/#respond Fri, 20 Oct 2017 04:45:43 +0000 /6e8/?p=4918 We adore heritage apples; no store-bought fruit is ever going to have the quirks, the character and the variation we see in old apple varieties. If you want to bake, why use a Granny Smith when you have access to Wolf River, Northern Spy or Caville Blanc D’hiver. Once you’ve picked up a Cox’s Orange […]

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We adore heritage apples; no store-bought fruit is ever going to have the quirks, the character and the variation we see in old apple varieties. If you want to bake, why use a Granny Smith when you have access to Wolf River, Northern Spy or Caville Blanc D’hiver. Once you’ve picked up a Cox’s Orange Pippin, an Ashmead’s Kernel or Grimes Golden, you’ll never enjoy a grocery store apple quite as much. With the number of known varieties in the *thousands*, there are so many amazing taste experiences to have.

We’re very fortunate that our founding head gardener, Sharon Rempel, collected a number of grafts from an old orchard in Oliver and created a small heritage apple orchard on our site. A few trees died and were regrafted, possibly with other varieties. Then, sometime around 2011, another manager added an additional 20 trees to the site. Unfortunately, record keeping has been exceptionally poor and the map we inherited for our main orchard is clearly not correct.

This year, we’ve photographed fruit from as many of our trees as we can, in the hopes that maybe you can help us identify them, or at least get us in the right ballpark. If you’re interested in a little detective work, we’d really love your help!

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What is a Community Contribution Corporation (C3)? https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/what-is-a-c3/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-is-a-c3 /6e8/blog/what-is-a-c3/#comments Thu, 06 Apr 2017 05:29:30 +0000 /6e8/?p=3288 Beginning in April 2017, a new company is taking over operation of the Grist Mill and Gardens Historic Site. The details are pretty technical, but we believe that our new corporate structure, combined with a now-granted ten year lease on the site with the Province of BC will allow for more stability than this exceptional […]

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Beginning in April 2017, a new company is taking over operation of the Grist Mill and Gardens Historic Site. The details are pretty technical, but we believe that our new corporate structure, combined with a now-granted ten year lease on the site with the Province of BC will allow for more stability than this exceptional piece of BC history has seen in more than a decade.

This new company, Grist Mill CCC, has the same ownership and key staff as the previous operator, Mathieson Heritage Services, but there are many changes “under the hood”. Most importantly, Grist Mill CCC is a new kind of company called a Community Contribution Corporation (or C3).

A C3 is for-profit company that is restricted–by law–in many of same ways non-profits and charities are and, most importantly, provides a real benefit to its community. It is a very specific kind of incorporation intended specifically for social enterprise.

What features make a C3 unique?

Like any other business, C3s are incorporated under the BC Business Corporations Act. Changes were made to that Act in 2012 and this form of corporate structure was made available to register in 2013. By 2015, there were almost thirty C3s incorporated in BC. Grist Mill CCC was the thirty-fifth.

Like all C3s, we are required to have a community purpose written into our Articles of Incorporation, ensuring it is a fundamental part of the company. The community purpose for our Grist Mill CCC is as follows:

Grist Mill C3 Community Purpose Statement

Community Purpose
This company exists to undertake sustainable and community-minded commercial activity in support of the preservation, rehabilitation and public access to the heritage represented at the Grist Mill and Gardens historic site. Further, this company recognizes the important role the site plays in the community, doing the following:

  • Supporting the development of a strong and integrated local economy
  • Supporting other socially-minded organizations in their own community purposes
  • Providing arts, culture and educational opportunities.

How do C3s differ from a typical private company?

One obvious difference is that the company must have “Community Contribution Corporation” or “CCC” in it’s name, but the big difference is that C3s are subject to an “asset lock,” meaning there¡¯s strict rules on how profits and assets can be handled–the bulk of a C3¡¯s profits must go towards the C3¡¯s community purposes (or be transferred to a qualified entity, such as a charity). The other major difference is that C3s are subject to a higher degree of accountability – for example, they must have three directors, instead of just one, and are required to publish an annual ¡°community contribution¡± report describing their activities. Both of these requirements are intended to help ensure the community purposes of the C3 are being properly fulfilled.

The next question seems obvious: Why choose a business model so full of restrictions, without the benefits that come with being a non-profit or a registered charity?

Everyone who establishes a C3 has their own reasons, but here are ours…

Since our team took over operation of the site in 2013, the community has been very clear about the sort of role the Grist Mill can and should play in their community; including a statement of community benefit makes it clear that we respect those values and wish to be held accountable for them. We’d spent the previous three years building strong relationships with a wide variety of stakeholders in the community and wanted to sustain, and leverage, that social capital for the ongoing benefit of the site and the community.

Early during this process to secure a long-term lease, we considered the possibility of dissolving our own business so that we could work with a local non-profit to help them secure the lease, figuring that might provide the ultimate community benefit. Unfortunately, there was no volunteer-led group with adequate capacity to govern and operate a complex site such as this.

No matter the structure, it was clear that the provincial government wanted to see its own role reduced on the site and so seemed prepared to consider a wider variety of business activities here, possibly even ones that might not be preferred by the community. Creating a C3 and securing a long term lease does much to ensure that the core heritage of the site is respected and that it will continue to be operated as a community amenity and historic attraction.

Next Steps

The 2017 season will be the first one for Grist Mill CCC and we will be hosting several stakeholder engagement events through the year as we plan out our next decade of operation on the site. We also particularly look forward to preparing and publishing our first community contribution report in about a year to detail the ways in which we’ve met our community objectives. Hopefully, we can publish less formal updates on the rewards and challenges associated with this fascinating new business model and its suitability for managing community facilities like ours.

If you would be interested in contributing your perspectives or expertise as we explore the possibilities of the Community Contribution Corporation model, please get in touch with us at chris@ tỷ lệ cá cược bóng đá www.starhotelbattambang.com anytime. We’re also always looking for volunteers to lend a hand on our day-to-day operation of this exceptional piece of BC heritage.

Come join us!

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Call for Presenters – 2017 Speaker and Workshop Series https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/call-for-presenters-2017/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=call-for-presenters-2017 /6e8/blog/call-for-presenters-2017/#respond Thu, 16 Feb 2017 19:59:22 +0000 /6e8/?p=3246 The Grist Mill and Gardens has now started planning our 2017 lecture and workshop series and we’re looking for speakers and hands-on presenters for a wide variety of topics. We are a 12 acre BC heritage site in the heart of the Similkameen Valley featuring western Canada¡¯s only working waterwheel-powered flour mill (built in 1877) […]

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The Grist Mill and Gardens has now started planning our 2017 lecture and workshop series and we’re looking for speakers and hands-on presenters for a wide variety of topics.

We are a 12 acre BC heritage site in the heart of the Similkameen Valley featuring western Canada¡¯s only working waterwheel-powered flour mill (built in 1877) and stunning ornamental, herb and vegetable gardens. History, agriculture and art combine in fascinating ways on our site and here are just some of the sorts of topics we’d love to see:

  • Food Preservation (canning, smoking, curing, drying)
  • Food Production (bread baking, cheesemaking, sprouting grains, microgreens)
  • Food Issues (food security, climate change, GMOs)
  • Local History (geneology, local characters, archeology, First Nations history)
  • Gardening (planning a garden, xeriscaping, composting, seed saving, companion planting, pruning, pest control)
  • Plant Identification and Uses (healing herbs, foraging, invasive species, natural dying with plants)
  • Wildlife (birds, bats, pollinators)
  • Visual Arts (painting, sketching, photography)
  • Fibre Arts (spinning, weaving, knitting, crochet, sewing, quilting, lace-making)
  • Rural Living Skills (wood stove cooking, raising chickens and other livestock, candle making, soap making)
  • Traditional Crafts (making paper, pressed flowers, wreath making, flower arrangement, quilling)

We generally offer two styles of presentation:

  1. Lectures – These are offered on weekend afternoons or weekday evenings and are usually no more than an hour long. Weekend lectures are offered at no additional cost to visitors and seasons pass holders. We generally offer an honourarium for these presentations.
  2. Hands-on Workshops – These are generally two or more hours long and run on weekday evenings or during half or full days on the weekend. They often have registration fees associated which are split with the presenter.

If you’re interested in presenting here in 2017 on these (or any other topic that seems relevant), please use the form below to tell us more about what you’d like to propose.

Please direct all questions to Chris Mathieson, Site Operator / General Manager at info@ tỷ lệ cá cược bóng đá www.starhotelbattambang.com and please share this with anyone else you think might be interested. Deadline to submit a proposal is March 9, 2017 and submissions will be considered in the order received.

[contact-form]

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Call for Entertainers – 2017 Summer Concert Series and more https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/call-for-entertainers-2017-summer-concert-series-and-more/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=call-for-entertainers-2017-summer-concert-series-and-more /6e8/blog/call-for-entertainers-2017-summer-concert-series-and-more/#respond Thu, 08 Dec 2016 21:31:56 +0000 /6e8/?p=2988 The Grist Mill and Gardens has now started planning our 2017 schedule of events and have numerous opportunities for musicians and entertainers. 1) Summer Concert Series The Grist Mill is a 12 acre Provincial Heritage Site in the heart of the Similkameen Valley featuring western Canada¡¯s only working waterwheel-powered flour mill and stunning gardens. Our […]

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Valdy performing in our Summer Kitchen in summer 2016.
Valdy performing in our Summer Kitchen in summer 2016.

The Grist Mill and Gardens has now started planning our 2017 schedule of events and have numerous opportunities for musicians and entertainers.

1) Summer Concert Series

The Grist Mill is a 12 acre Provincial Heritage Site in the heart of the Similkameen Valley featuring western Canada¡¯s only working waterwheel-powered flour mill and stunning gardens. Our Summer Kitchen provides an intimate, rustic outdoor venue for folk, roots and world music for audiences of up to 200 from June to Sept.

The last four years, we’ve hosted an evening concert series and hope to do the same this summer, with a further expanded lineup. (Four shows in 2013, six in 2014, ten in 2015 and thirteen in 2016.) The series features one outdoor evening show a week from Mid-June to early September, timed to coincide with the spectacular sunsets here in the Similkameen Valley. Dates are somewhat flexible, but we’d prefer Thursday to Saturday evenings to ensure the largest possible audiences.

If you’re part of a group of no more than four members that might be suitable for headlining one of these shows, we’d love to hear from you.

2) Special Event Days

11280517_1757465281146861_281209523_n
Shari Ulrich performing in our Summer Kitchen to a full crowd.

Each year, the Grist Mill hosts a number of special event days with our partners including Victoria Day, Father’s Day, Canada Day, BC Day and Labour Day as well as our Fall Fair in September and Apple Day festival (in October). We’re always looking for musicians or other performers interested in being a part of these family-oriented events and we can accommodate amplified performances in our Summer Kitchen, roving or busking style performances throughout our site and more.

3) Private Events

The Grist Mill often hosts events such as weddings, reunions or private receptions are are often asked for a list of recommended musical acts to play unamplified in our gardens for their event. Classical guitar, wind or string trios or quartets would be ideal for these sorts of opportunities.

If you’re interested in any of these opportunities, please contact us at entertainers@ tỷ lệ cá cược bóng đá www.starhotelbattambang.com no later than Feb 1, 2017 with the following information:

  • Group/Artist Name
  • Main Contact and contact information (phone #, email address, etc)
  • Theme/Style of Music or Type of Act
  • Number of performers in act
  • Available Dates & Times
  • A brief overview of the experience and background of the act
  • The rundown of the equipment requirements for your performance
  • Compensation expectations
  • Any other information you think would help us find the perfect opportunity for you

We would also appreciate a sample of you performing, either a video or audio recording. You can email us links or mail us CDs or DVDs, whatever is most appropriate. If you don’t have recordings, we may request an in-person audition.

Please direct all questions or submissions?to Chris Mathieson, Site Operator at entertainers@oldgristmill.ca.

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Recipe: Victorian Christmas Cake https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/recipe-victorian-christmas-cake/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=recipe-victorian-christmas-cake /6e8/blog/recipe-victorian-christmas-cake/#respond Sun, 20 Nov 2016 23:56:48 +0000 /6e8/?p=2888 The post Recipe: Victorian Christmas Cake appeared first on The Grist Mill and Gardens at Keremeos.

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image

Victorian Christmas Cake

  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Print

Full of fruits and spices, and perhaps lots of brandy, a scratch-made Victorian Christmas cake was a great way to show off wealth.

Original recipe source: Elaine Lemm, although we’ve made a few adjustments.

Ingredients

  • 525g (3 ? cups) currants
  • 225g (1 ? cups)?golden raisins/sultanas
  • 225g (1 ? cups)?raisins
  • 110g (3/4 cup) mixed candied peel, finely chopped (make your own, using this easy recipe)
  • 165 (1 cup) ?glace cherries, halved
  • 300g (3 1/3 cups) plain flour
  • Pinch salt
  • 1/4 level teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 level teaspoon ground allspice
  • ? level teaspoon?ground cinnamon
  • ? level teaspoon?freshly ground nutmeg
  • 300g (10 oz) butter, slightly softened
  • 300g (1 1/3 cups) soft brown sugar
  • Zest of ? lemon
  • 6 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 3 tablespoon?brandy, plus extra for feeding

Directions

  • Heat the oven to 150C/300F/Gas 2 The temperature is low as the cake needs a long slow bake. It is packed with sugars, fruits and brandy and if the temperature is any higher the outside of the cake will burn and the inside be undercooked.
  • Line a 23cm (9″) cake tin with 2 thicknesses of parchment. Tie a double band of brown or newspaper paper around the outside. This acts as an insulator and to prevent the cake from burning.
  • In a large roomy baking bowl mix the currants, sultanas, raisins, peel and cherries with the flour, salt and spices.
  • In another large bowl cream the butter with the sugar until light and fluffy. Stir in the lemon zest. Add the beaten egg to the butter mixture a little bit at a time, beating well after each addition – do not try to rush this process as the mixture could curdle. If it does curdle simply add a tbsp of flour and mix again, this should bring the mixture back together. If it doesn’t come back together, don’t fret, the cake will still be delicious.
  • Carefully fold in half the flour and fruit into the egg and butter mixture, once incorporated repeat with the remaining flour and fruit. Finally add the brandy.
  • Spoon the cake mixture into the prepared cake tin making sure there are no air pockets. Once filled smooth the surface with the back of s spoon and make a slight dip in the center (this will rise back up again during cooking and create a smooth surface for icing the cake).
  • Finally, using a piece of paper towel clean up any smears of cake batter on the parchment wrapping, if left on they will burn, and though it won’t affect the cake, it doesn’t smell too good.
  • Stand the tin on a double layer of newspaper in the lower part of the oven and bake for 4? hours. If the cake is browning too rapidly, cover the tin with a double layer of parchment paper after 2? hours. During the cooking time avoid opening the oven door too often as this may cause the cake to collapse.
  • imageAfter 4? hours check the cake is cooked. The cake should be nicely risen and a deep brown all over. Insert a skewer or fine knife into the centre of the cake. If there is sticky dough on the skewer when you pull it out it needs cooking longer, if it is clean, the cake’s done and remove from the oven.
  • Leave the cake to cool in the tin on a wire rack for an hour, then remove from the tin and leave to cool completely. Once cooled prick the surface of the cake with a fine metal skewer and slowly pour over 2 – 3 tbsp brandy. This feeding should be repeated every two weeks up until Christmas. The cake should be stored wrapped in parchment paper in an airtight tin.

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Recipe: Candied Peel https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/recipe-candied-peel/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=recipe-candied-peel /6e8/blog/recipe-candied-peel/#comments Sun, 20 Nov 2016 20:57:08 +0000 /6e8/?p=2890 After a lifetime of the dull-flavoured chopped “peel” you find in the grocery store at Christmas time, this easy recipe is a true revelation. You can use any kind of citrus, and each variety will give you a different taste and texture experience. We love eating candied peel on it’s own, or on a place […]

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After a lifetime of the dull-flavoured chopped “peel” you find in the grocery store at Christmas time, this easy recipe is a true revelation. You can use any kind of citrus, and each variety will give you a different taste and texture experience.

We love eating candied peel on it’s own, or on a place with nuts and cheese, but it also makes an out-of-the-world incredibly in your homemade fruitcake, mincemeat or shaved thinly on your whipped shortbread.

Candied Peel

  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Enjoy these on a cheese and nut plate or as an ingredient in your Christmas baking.

Ingredients

  • Your favourite citrus fruit (oranges, lemons, grapefruit, limes, etc)
  • 1? cups granulated sugar
  • ? cup water

Directions

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  1. Rinse the fruit.
  2. Remove the skin (peel and pith, the white part), and cut the skin into strips about ?” wide. Set the fruit itself aside and plan something fantastic to make with it.
  3. Place the strips of peel in a large saucepan and cover with cold water.
  4. Set on the stove on high heat and bring to a boil. Drain the water from the peels and repeat this process twice more.
  5. In a small bowl, whisk together the sugar and ? cup water.
  6. Pour the sugar water into a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer. Let the mixture cook for 8-9 minutes at a constant simmer.
  7. imageAdd the peel and cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, adjusting heat as necessary to maintain the simmer. Avoid stirring, as this will cause crystallation. If necessary, swirl the pan to make sure that all of the peels get covered with the syrup. At the end of this period, the peels should be translucent.
  8. Drain any remaining syrup from the peels and set aside for other use (perhaps tea?!) There will probably be only a tablespoon or two of syrup left. Spread the peels out on a drying rack and leave to dry for 4-5 hours. Store in an airtight container with some granulated sugar at the bottom.

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Recipe: Victorian Mincemeat Tarts https://www.google.com//6e8/blog/recipe-mincemeat/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=recipe-mincemeat /6e8/blog/recipe-mincemeat/#respond Thu, 17 Nov 2016 06:56:46 +0000 /6e8/?p=2886 The sweet and spiced fruity filling we now think of as mincemeat is a pale imitation of the minced meat (and spice, preserved with brandy) of long ago that was served as a main course, instead of a dessert. As spices and fruit became more commonly available historically, the recipe shifted from savory to sweet. […]

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The sweet and spiced fruity filling we now think of as mincemeat is a pale imitation of the minced meat (and spice, preserved with brandy) of long ago that was served as a main course, instead of a dessert. As spices and fruit became more commonly available historically, the recipe shifted from savory to sweet. This recipe bridges the gap, providing a filling that’s familiar (if richer and tastier) while still including not only the beef fat (suet) but also some meat itself.

This is a great recipe to make ahead; the alcohol and sugar in the recipe provide a strong preservative effect and properly canned, this filling can be stored for a year or longer and getting tastier as it does so.

Check out this article for some great stories form the history of mincemeat. We’re particularly curious about the whale mincemeat in 1861…

Mincemeat Tarts

  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

No store-bought version can compare to the deep, rich flavours of scratch-made mincemeat, especially with a traditional recipe like this.

Like many old recipes, this one is vague on the amount of spice to add. Trust your instincts and keep notes for next time. Also, the ingredients that do have definite quantities are in weights, not volumes, so be sure to pull out your kitchen scale.

Adapted from BBC Food.

Ingredients

For the mincemeat

  • 450g/1lb sirloin steak, finely chopped
  • 450g/1lb suet, grated (if you buy a bag of “chopped suet”, you’ll likely find flour listed as an ingredient; try instead of find pure suet at a local butcher. If included, the flour makes the texture of the filling much more pasty.)
  • 4 large apples, peeled, core removed, flesh chopped
  • 1.35kg/3lb currants
  • ? small loaf day-old bread, grated
  • Freshly grated nutmeg, to taste
  • Ground cinnamon, to taste
  • Ground cloves, to taste
  • Ground ginger, to taste
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 450g/1lb sugar
  • 2 lemons, zest and juice
  • 3 large oranges, juice only
  • Candied peel, diced (optional,o but its easy to make your own and adds a ton of flavour)
  • 250ml/9fl oz brandy
  • 250ml/9fl oz ruby port

For the shortcrust pastry

  • 225g/8oz flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 115g/4oz butter or margarine, cut into cubes
  • Water, as necessary
  • 4-6 tsp milk
  • 1 tsp sugar

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F.
  2. For the mincemeat, mix all of the mincemeat ingredients together in a large bowl, using your hands, until well combined.
  3. Transfer the mixture to a saucepan and heat over a very low heat for 3-5 hours, stirring occasionally, or until it has reduced to a thick, dark paste.
  4. Meanwhile, for the shortcrust pastry, sift the flour into a large mixing bowl. Add the butter or margarine cubes, then rub them into the flour using your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  5. Gradually add the water, a tablespoon at a time, stirring well until the mixture comes together as a stiff dough.
  6. Turn out the pastry onto a lightly floured work surface and knead well until smooth and elastic.
  7. Roll out the pastry onto a lightly floured work surface to a 1cm/0.5in thickness. Using an upturned bowl, cut 8-10 discs from the pastry. Reserve the remaining pastry.
  8. Place a coffee mug into the centre of each pastry disc and draw the sides of the pastry up against the mug, overlapping the edges, to form free-standing pastry cases.
  9. Divide the mincemeat evenly among the pastry cases.
  10. Roll out the remaining pastry onto a lightly floured work surface. Using the same mug as before, cut 8-10 discs from the pastry to create ‘lids’.
  11. Place one pastry ‘lid’ on top of each pie, tucking the edges into the pastry case. Pinch the pastry together well to prevent the filling from leaking out during baking. Using a sharp knife, cut a cross into the top of each pastry lid to allow the steam to escape.
  12. In a bowl, mix together the milk and sugar until the sugar has dissolved. Brush the top of each pie with this mixture.
  13. Place the mince pies onto a baking tray. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, or until the pastry is crisp and golden-brown.
  14. Remove the mince pies from the oven and cool on a wire rack.

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